Desktop updates:

  • installed a video player sudo apt install mvp
  • installed a disk manager via audo apt install gnome-disk-utility which can be opened via gnome-disks
    • fuck this, formated the 6TB drive to ext4 via gparted and mounted it in /home/hisfantor/internal
    • gave me all rights on the disk via sudo chmod 777 /home/hisfantor/internal
    • started transfer of 1.1TB of movies, with a current write speed of 73MB/s

Workshop PC:

  • checked Solidworks instalation -> all good for now

Notebook:

  • I used my google drive via a server connection in nautilus, but I couldn’t live edit an html file so I wanted to use google-drive-ocamlfuse
  • had some trouble installing it the usual way like described here
  • I found the ppa on here and downloaded the .deb manually
  • then installed it via sudo dpkg -i /path/to/deb/file && sudo apt-get install -f
  • also included exec_always google-drive-ocamlfuse ~/googledrive in my i3 config

Pi Calendar:

  • introduction of a second led and loop functions
  • I had enough of the visual programing in Sketch and switched to python on the commandline
  • make sure you have python-rpi.gpio installed
import RPi.GPIO as GPIO 		
#improting the GPIO functions
import time						
#time for pauses between steps

GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BCM)			
#that's the method how to assign the pins
GPIO.setup(24, GPIO.OUT)		
# use the pins as out
GPIO.setup(18, GPIO.OUT)		
#I used the same pins as the calendar

t = 0.5 						
#varable for timing(t in s)

def dot():					
# I used the two LEDs to make a little morse code
# dot/short is the first LED
	GPIO.output(24, GPIO.HIGH)	
	time.sleep(t)
	GPIO.output(24, GPIO.LOW)
	time.sleep(t)

def dash():						
#dash/long is the second LED
	GPIO.output(18, GPIO.HIGH)
	time.sleep(t)
	GPIO.output(18, GPIO.LOW)
	time.sleep(t)

def stop():						
#in between letters both LEDs light up
	GPIO.output(24, GPIO.HIGH)
	GPIO.output(18, GPIO.HIGH)
	time.sleep(t)
	GPIO.output(24, GPIO.LOW)
	GPIO.output(18, GPIO.LOW)
	time.sleep(t)

dot()
dash()
dot()
dash()
stop()

dot()
dot()
stop()

dot()
stop()

#...

GPIO.cleanup()					
#stes back all the GPIO settings and turns everything off
  • that’s my first code in Python ever and I really like it, its conda confusing that a function block is defined by tabs and not curly brackets
  • also it’s awesome experimenting with the GPIO pins, all the potential it brings to the table!